Identification and characterization of the biological effects of enamel proteins

Amel and Ambn, on progenitor cells and mesenchymal tissue regeneration

 

About the project

Biomineralization is highly regulated in all living species, and hypo- or hyper mineralization can cause disease and/or organ failure in man. We aim at establishing a causal relationship between the molecular mechanisms involved and how these are regulated in various tissues can provide us with powerful tools to induce and control repair processes. Formation of hard tissue in bone and teeth are initiated by the formation of extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by osteoblasts or ameloblasts, respectively. Ameloblastin (Ambn) and amelogenin (Amel) are extracellular matrix proteins that recently were identifed to be expressed and play roles in bone formation and remodelling, and not only in enamel formation. These proteins and their downstream effects in progenitor cells and mesenchymal tissue will be the main focus on this project. Fractions and recombinant human matrix proteins, Amel and Ambn, and their peptides will be screened by in vitro models for their capability to induce or promote matrix synthesis, differentiation in ostogenic or chondrogenic direction, and biomineralization. Probes and/or antibodies based on purified molecules showing bioactivity and good in vivo stability will be used to map functions of the isolated matrix macromolecules, and to identify binding sites and intracellular signaling cascades.

Cooperation

  • Dr. Ivan Slaby | Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Czech republic
  • Prof. Jiri Vondrasek | Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Czech republic
  • Assoc prof Marta Monjo | Universitat de les Illes Balears (UIB)
  • Prof. Malcolm L. Snead | University of Southern California, USA
  • Prof. Michael L. Pain | University of Southern California, USA
Tags: Biomaterials, Biomineralization, Stem cells, Amelogenin, ameloblastin
Published Jan. 2, 2013 2:26 PM - Last modified Jan. 2, 2013 2:26 PM